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  • hardie karges 6:07 am on December 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: anger, , , , , , spiritual bypassing, Three Poisons   

    Buddhism Unmoved: in Support of ‘Spiritual Bypassing’ 

    The one who can control himself, can control the world—his world…

    Anger is an object lesson, not just about hatred, which seems obvious, but lust, craving, passion, and all the rest. It feeds on itself until it destroys something, if not everything. This is one of the Three Poisons of Buddhism, along with greed and ignorance, and it would be hard to decide which is worse. Because they all destroy whatever is in their path, like fires burning endlessly and mindlessly, when the obvious solution would be to simply let them go, to burn themselves out. If any three words could sum up the message of Buddhism, it would likely be, ‘let it go.’

    But it’s not always so easy, of course, given the nature of the beast, its very nature being its difficulty to let go. So, in a sense, they are all one, that fire burning, which we Westerners like to immortalize as something romantic called ‘passion,’ while conveniently forgetting that word’s roots in suffering, as in the ‘passion of Christ,’ nothing romantic about that. But so we fantasize, that our greed is our glory and our lust is our love, when nothing could be further from the truth, from any metaphysical viewpoint—at least, not in Buddhism.

    Because Buddhism is a religion and philosophy of dispassion, in both the traditional meaning of ending suffering and the modern meaning of avoiding strong emotion. This drives many Western psychologists crazy, of course, because they sense any emptiness as a cause of alarm. The first thing they teach in photography class is to ‘go for peak emotion.’ And the psychologists want all potential conflicts to be met head-on. To not do so is something they call ‘spiritual bypassing,’ with obvious derision. Well, if avoiding anger is ‘bypassing,’ then I heartily recommend it. For nothing good can come from anger. One man’s religion is another man’s aversion, I suppose.

     
  • hardie karges 6:55 am on November 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: anger, , , , multi-tasking, , tourist, workaholic   

    Buddhism as a Second Language: Welcome to Thailand… 

    IMG_2692My name is Hardie and I am a workaholic. I started with the small stuff, house raisings and assorted cabin crew, sharp nails into wood and flesh, before moving on to the harder stuff—self-employment! And business!! Ouch!!! But that was just the warm-up to the true disease, a consistent and constant submission to the little man upstairs, who whispered in my ear little things like: “Have you ever heard of multi-tasking?” And that was my downfall, multiple jobs and multiple careers, all simultaneously and in synchronicity—more or less…

    Because, as we now know, there is no true multi-tasking, but more like constant switching, so not a true mix of jobs, but an assortment of jobs, in several cities, and countries, and the constant switching between them, in real time, that is largely a waste of time, and energy, like nibbling from a plate of hors d’oeuvres while stuck in traffic instead of having a healthy solid meal on a nice plate in a nice room with a nice family… (More …)

     
    • Dave Kingsbury 4:37 pm on November 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great story, Hardie, exemplifying the philosophy very well. That mix of reflection and anecdote really works for me and this bit (edited slightly to bring out the structure) is a nice summary of the Buddhist stance:

      The consumptive mental afflictions that once threatened are now almost laughable. More importantly, the possession and aggression has been reduced to a level low enough to suppress easily and almost instantaneously…
      Better still: this comes at little cost to healthy emotions, such that intensity of feelings has never been higher, while attachment to them has never been lower, and that’s the Holy Grail of Buddhism—the cup always at least half full, never overflowing, but never empty, of anything except intrinsic reality…

      • hardie karges 5:51 pm on November 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanx, Dave, you can edit me any time you like! p.s. I don’t say that to everyone, haha…

        • Dave Kingsbury 2:01 am on November 14, 2017 Permalink

          Just thought, Hardie, didn’t mean that as a criticism but as a way of making it more generally applicable – I think the personal dimension of your piece is what gives it bite …

        • hardie karges 2:21 am on November 14, 2017 Permalink

          No criticism, flattered TBH, to get a DJ remix…

    • buddhistronin 8:46 pm on November 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Been there done that! Maybe it is our often overly aggressive response to the smallest things that causes us to be treated as tourest. Thais have general acceptance of most things. We westerners are certainly not like that. Good post!

    • kadynomlid 4:18 pm on December 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Awesome place to be! Have fun!

    • anextraordinaryandordinarylifeblog 10:31 am on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi,nice post
      Im seeing myself in what you wrote,finding the balance,finding the balance,that nice feeling of pracefulness,you feel it one time and then you do as much you can to get back there
      Im not religious but I feel that Buddhism is the closest to explain what life is

      • hardie karges 4:19 pm on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks! I appreciate the feedback, nice to know that I’m connecting with someone sometimes…

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