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  • hardie karges 8:50 am on July 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bodhicitta, , , , , , , kindness, , ,   

    Buddhism Made Easy: Kindness, Compassion, and all that Meditation… 

    Meditation every day keeps the doctor away, and a little kindness helps, too. That pretty much wraps up the gist of Buddhism, without all the doctrines and the calls to action, when inaction is often much preferred. Because Christianity may indeed have been a better paradigm for development of a world raw and wild, but Buddhism is the better paradigm for sustainability. And that is much the reason why I am here. The sentiment is easily extrapolated or interpolated for the life of an ordinary human being, also, such that Christianity might indeed be the better model for growing up and developing, but Buddhism is the better model for settling in and settling down, for the long haul…

    The Four Noble (Aryan) Truths and the primacy of suffering form the cornerstone of Buddhism’s overt doctrine, but meditation is the cornerstone of covert discipline. And so we tame the body and mind as we tame the world, and suddenly things become clearer. The natural animosity of the state of Nature is nothing of the sort when two typically argumentative species—say dogs and cats—are raised together as pups and kittens from the earliest days, keeping each other warm when nights are cold, and heaters are just fantasies from the north country. Is there any better example of Bodhicitta, i.e. Buddha nature?

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  • hardie karges 1:05 pm on December 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , kindness,   

    Snarky Buddha Tweet: Special Sale on Kindness and Compassion, all at reasonable rates… 

    I’m looking for something in everyone’s eyes: honesty, kindness, consideration, and compassion, smile optional, must be willing to re-locate. Laughter is the best medicine, no prescription required. Love comes with a warning…

     
  • hardie karges 11:42 am on January 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: arrogance, , , , kindness, Paradise, paradox,   

    Paradox in Paradise, the Buddha’s Suffering as Our Own… 

    Life is sometimes too easy. Without struggle there is no need for kindness. Thus we confront a Buddhist paradox, every day, in a world at least partly defined by its suffering, and the need to mitigate that suffering, so that we can survive, without falling into the trap of false flattery and the lure of luxury. Because if the suffering is a matter of opinion and the appropriate means of measure, the imperfection is rife. There may be a perfect world somewhere, of which this is but a poor manifestation, admittedly, but not this reflected world itself, which at times resembles a cheap carnival sideshow. But this is the only world that we truly experience on an ordinary day, so this is the hand we play. And that is okay. If this material world is all we ever know, then so be it. And let the imperfections speak for themselves. Because every imperfection is an opportunity for improvement, in life as in genetics, in which natural mutations provide the raw material for evolution. So if nothing ever changes, then there’s no chance for it to get better, and perfection is just hubris, the arrogance of species, this human species, full of itself and full of its self-importance, which is only partially justified. The human species IS important, but not always for the reasons that we think. It is not important because it is ABOVE the rest of the animal kingdom. It is important, because it is OF the rest of the animal kingdom, in an unbroken chain of Becoming, of which we humans are probably on top, that is true, but which is no reason for celebration, and certainly no reason for arrogance, for we were once only poor struggling mammals, looking for strength and succor. Thus the flip-side of freedom is always responsibility, and that is our lot in life. Always treat people better than they treat you, and the world becomes a nicer place…

     
  • hardie karges 12:53 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Buddhsim, kindness, ,   

    Reality Po’ Boys: the Light Within Us and the Light Without… 

    A kind word can heal forever, just as an unkind word can wound. Indifference is not the best option, but a healthy silence is okay. Such is the hand we play, as opposed to the hand that we’re dealt. Because this is not the best of all possible worlds, enshrined in legend and showcased in gold. The best of all possible worlds would be pure light, magnetic and electric, but we can only barely perceive that world, so imagine it as a force, outside us and distant. But once we perceive that force as inside us and accessible, then the equation changes and the call to action becomes explicit. It is our position as intermediaries to retransmit that internal light back outward to its external locus of purity. Because the reflected light within us is muddled and muddied, conflicted and confused, by virtue of its inferior status of self-ness, earth-bound and body-tired, while the light of external space is godly and illuminating. But that is neither here nor there, because the light is just indicative of our reflected status, a function of frequencies, and tendencies to exist, when there are no better options available. So we fall in love with this earth and this body, for as long as it lasts, and for whatever good it will do, because it is ultimately doomed to failure, no matter how hard we try, and the common phrase for that is ‘we’re all going to die’. And so the pretensions of humanity fall flat on their faces, no matter the lineage or the appearance of race. This physical world is but a tiny whirlpool in the cosmic stream, where the going gets slow and white light passes through the spectrum of physicality, rain and snow and fog and steam and all the colors of the rainbow’s stream, in full panoramic display, beauty incarnate and suffering, too, the price of our perfection its negation. So cries and crises ensue and volcanoes erupt, earthquakes and landslides and the rising price of a 20-ounce cup. Now the only path forward loops around and comes back to haunt us, every time and in every place. But there is no cause for anger, as this is simply the way of our world, by definition. There is no cure. The cure for anger would be a creative solution to the cause, but Buddhist meditation can work in the meanwhile…

     
    • KINDNESS 3:06 am on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Merry Christmas 🎄

      • hardie karges 4:19 am on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. Merry Christmas to you also, and a happy new year.

  • hardie karges 12:46 pm on August 24, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , kindness   

    Random Acts of Kindness 

    The Little Old Lady (LOL for short; wait a minute…) was barely halfway across the street, when the light turned green, she teetering and tottering and hanging on for dear life, walking stick in one hand, rolling luggage in the other, a look of chemical fear spreading across her face while I looked on from the distant shore of her destination.  She reminded me of Hetty from NCIS-LA, aka Linda Hunt, long past her gender-ambiguous days as Billy Kwan in ‘Year of Living Dangerously,’ and now just the LOL that she is, naked and afraid like a deer caught in the headlights.  Hetty’s tough, but is it enough?  It’s still LA; am I to be her LL Cool J?  She’s hanging in there; good thing, too, because the car in the lane she’s just now cleared is hot to trot, got his motor running, heading out on the highway, looking for adventure, etc.  The car in the lane she’s still in is holding still at the traffic light.  He sees me watching him.  

    I’m tempted to just step out, grab her under the arms, lift her up, and carry her over to the near shore,, but… that might scare her more than the traffic.  I don’t want to startle her… or insult her either, for that matter.  So I start inching my way out, as if approaching a dog whose masticatory habits I’m unfamiliar with, then reach out my hand to take the luggage.  She hands it to me.  I place it on the curb.  We’re good.  Then I reach out again, to take her hand and steady her while she steps up on to the curb.  She’s somebody’s mother, after all, and obviously not homeless.  Why is she out here on the streets alone?  “Are you okay?” I ask.  “Oh, thank you so much!” she exults.  “Well, you’re welcome so much.  It’s nothing,” I respond.  And it wasn’t.  What I did for her was negligible.  But what she did for me was priceless. 

     
    • kc 1:38 pm on August 24, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      for some reason, “no good deed goes unpunished,” so look for some rainy skies coming your way

c
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